Public Lecture

by Aoife Granville & Dale Jarvis

Thursday, September 8, 2016 @ 6pm

Memorial University’s Research Centre for the Study of

Music, Media and Place (MMaP)

Located in the Arts and Culture Centre, St. John's


"We never died a winter yet":

The Sráid Eoin Wrenboys of Dingle

 

By Aoife Granville

The tradition of the wren (pronounced locally 'wran') has survived and thrived in a unique way in Dingle, County Kerry with four rival bands and masqueraders parading around the town boundaries on December 26th. This lecture will explore the contemporary tradition of the wren in Dingle, its musical repertoire and the influence of the tradition on community identity. The lecture will be enhanced by recent video footage, interviews and performance.

Aoife Granville is from Dingle and is highly regarded as a multi-instrumentalist and singer. She has performed, toured and recorded extensively and released her second solo album, Sáimhín Só, in April 2014. Aoife is regarded as an influential figure in the contemporary Irish fluting tradition and holds a PhD in Ethnomusicology (UCC). She teaches, lectures and researches in Irish traditional music, festival musics and popular music culture having held lectureship posts at Newcastle University (UK) and University College Cork. Aoife has been an invited lecturer and performer throughout Ireland as well as through Europe and the US and is the currently researching an Arts Council funded project on the songs of Corca Dhuibhne from Bailiúcháin na Scol (The Schools Collection).

Aoife Granville is from Dingle and is highly regarded as a multi-instrumentalist and singer. She has performed, toured and recorded extensively and released her second solo album, Sáimhín Só, in April 2014. Aoife is regarded as an influential figure in the contemporary Irish fluting tradition and holds a PhD in Ethnomusicology (UCC). She teaches, lectures and researches in Irish traditional music, festival musics and popular music culture having held lectureship posts at Newcastle University (UK) and University College Cork. Aoife has been an invited lecturer and performer throughout Ireland as well as through Europe and the US and is the currently researching an Arts Council funded project on the songs of Corca Dhuibhne from Bailiúcháin na Scol (The Schools Collection).


Any Mummers ’Lowed In?:

A Mummers Talk and Picture Show

By Dale Jarvis

As the Twelve Days of Christmas roll around each year in Newfoundland and Labrador, you might see oddly padded figures with humps on their backs, shoes on the wrong feet, their auntie’s bra on the outside of their clothes, with faces hidden behind masks or bits of old lace. These characters trudge from door to door or make surprise appearances at parties, seniors’ homes, or workplaces. Once inside, they dance and sing and have a drink or two while people try to guess just who is behind all that clothing. Then, before they roast from the heat of the kitchen, they head back out into the darkness and do it all over again. Folklorist and author Dale Jarvis presents an illustrated talk on his research on these strange creatures, using examples from historical records, oral histories, and collected photographs.

 

Dale Jarvis is the Intangible Cultural Heritage Development Officer for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. He holds a BSc in Anthropology/Archaeology from Trent University, and a MA in Folklore from Memorial University, and has been working for the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador since 1996. He has contributed as a board member and volunteer to many local arts and heritage organizations, and regularly teaches workshops on oral history, cultural documentation, folklore project management, and public folklore. His most recent book, released in October 2014, is entitled: “Any Mummers ‘Lowed In?: Christmas Mummering Traditions in Newfoundland and Labrador.

 

*Light refreshments will be available after the lecture.